Programs

Energy and Urbanization

Wednesday, April 29, 2015 from 12:30 to 2:00 p.m.

The Atlanta Regional Commission forecasts that the 20-county Atlanta region will grow to 8.3 million residents by 2040 from a base of 5.5 million in 2010. Atlanta is similar to many urban areas around the world as populations move to cities for employment and “enhanced” quality of life.

Urbanization can bring benefits – accelerating innovation, collaboration and the wider distribution of economic development and the prosperity that follows. But if managed poorly, urbanization could lead to declining quality of life, greater environmental degradation, accelerating greenhouse gas emissions, and social stresses.  In addition, the shift to urban living will intensify demand for resources including water, food and energy.  Globally, Shell Energy estimates that 66 percent of energy was consumed in urban environments in 2010 and by 2040 around 80 percent of energy will be consumed in cities.  (For reference, see New Lenses on Future Cities, Shell Energy, 2014)

On Wednesday, April 29, plan to join an important discussion on urbanization and energy use.

Jane Hayse, Director, Center for Livable Communities, Atlanta Regional Commission

Jane leads and coordinates efforts among four divisions of metro Atlanta’s regional planning agency: Community Development, Natural Resources, Research & Analytics and Transportation Accessibility & Mobility.

In 1989, Jane joined the regional planning agency and has led ARC’s transportation planning division since 1998, coordinating the development of the Atlanta region’s $61 billion long-range transportation plan. Prior to that, she worked in Cobb County’s Planning and Zoning Department and for the Metropolitan Council of the Twin Cities in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Jane holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Political Science from the University of North Carolina and a Master of Science in Urban and Regional Planning from Florida State University. She has served in many local and national leadership positions in her field and has received numerous awards, including the 2008 National Award for Outstanding Professional Achievement in Metropolitan Transportation Planning by the Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations. She is a graduate of the Institute for Georgia Environmental Leadership and the Regional Leadership Institute.

Ann Xu,  Research Engineer, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Ann’s research focuses on emissions and energy analysis and policy evaluation. Her research cuts across a broad range of transportation engineering, from travel behavior, emissions, to safety, with an explicit emphasis on sustainability.

From 2006 to 2010, Ann analyzed second-by-second vehicle activity data to evaluate the effectiveness of mileage-based pricing policies. She led the report to the Georgia Department of Transportation on the impact of value pricing on household travel behavior. She has developed the report to EPA on idle and emissions reduction of Cobb County School buses. In addition, Ann is the lead author of the Federal Transit Administration’s Transit Fleet Fuel and Emissions Calculator (FEC) in collaboration with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which assesses the impacts of purchase and operations decisions of alternative fuel and drivetrain transit systems on life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Ann has a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering with minor in Statistics from the Georgia Institute of Technology.  Her undergraduate degrees are in Environmental Science and Statistics from Peking University.

Matt Cox, Buildings Energy Efficiency Project Manager, Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Sustainability

Matt works to help Atlanta eliminate energy waste and capture cost-effectiveenergy efficiency opportunities through the development of policies and programs that strengthen the City’s overall sustainability goals. Currently, he is Senior Advisor to the City Energy Project, which aims to increase the energy efficiency of commercial buildings in ten cities across the United States, Matt is also the Chair of the City Advisors Network where he assists with the development of the climate action plan and the annual greenhouse gas inventories.

Matt has a Ph.D. in Public Policy with a focus on energy and the environment from the Georgia Institute of Technology.  In addition, he has a M.S. in Public Policy from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a B.S. in Environmental Biology from the University of Dayton.

Participants can attend for free in person at the Hodges Room in the Centergy Building on Georgia Tech’s campus or via Webinar.

 

Presentations:

Planning for the Atlanta Region: Thinking Big and Taking the Long View- Jane Hayse

Energy and Emissions Implications of Transportation Modes – Ann Xu

Managing Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Urban Buildings – Matt Cox

A Sleeping Giant: The Nexus of Water and Energy

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Water and energy are critical, mutually dependent resources—the production of energy requires large volumes of water and water infrastructure requires large amounts of energy.

Water is required to generate energy. Thermoelectric cooling, hydropower, energy mineral extraction and mining, fuel production (including fossil fuels, biofuels, and other non-conventional fuels), and emission controls all rely on large amounts of water. In the United States, the thermoelectric generating industry is the largest withdrawal user of water. According to U.S. Geological Survey, 349 billion gallons of freshwater were withdrawn per day in the United States in 2005. The largest use, thermoelectric, accounted for 41 percent of freshwater withdrawn at 143 billion gallons per day (BGD). However, freshwater consumption for thermoelectric purposes is low (only 3 percent) when compared to other use categories such as irrigation, which was responsible for 81 percent of water consumed.

Water supply also requires energy use. A large amount of energy is needed to extract, convey, treat, and deliver potable water. In addition, energy is required to collect, treat, and dispose of wastewater. In 2010, the U.S. water system consumed over 600 billion kWh, or approximately 12.6 percent of the nation’s energy according to research at the University of Texas at Austin. The research found that water systems use about 25 percent more energy than is used for residential or commercial lighting in the U.S.

On January 28th, plan to participate in a discussion on this often overlooked but vital topic.

John Crittenden, Director, Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems, Georgia Institute of Technology

John’s research interests involve pollution prevention, energy/water dynamics, heat and mass transfer and systems modeling. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar.

John has a PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Michigan.

Kevin Haas, Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineeing, Georgia Institute of Technology

Kevin’s research interests include include coastal engineering, extracting energy from waves and currents, numerical modeling of nearshore circulation, sediment transport in coastal regions and hydrodynamics of rip current systems.

Kevin has a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Delaware.

Presentations:

“Water Energy Nexus” for Energy Supply in the 21st Century- John Crittenden

Marine Hydrokinetic Energy: Can it Power the Southeast?- Kevin A. Haas

The Agile Utility: Aligning Distributed Generation With Consumer Demand

Wednesday, November 12, 2014, 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM

Nationwide, the role of distributed generation, e.g., solar and wind, among utilities is becoming increasingly important for generation portfolio diversification, operating profitability and reliability, and meeting consumer demand. As distributed generation resources become integrated, utilities find themselves under increasing pressure to better manage and optimize resources because of ROI considerations and market/service expectations. (See Georgia Tech Energy Series program, March 2014.)

Innovation, which brought forward distributed generation technologies, is also bringing forward tools to integrate, manage and optimize these resources. For the long-term, utility business models, which incorporate distributed generation and tools for demand management and resource optimization, are emerging with positive results.

On Wednesday, November 12, plan to join a half-day seminar on this timely topic.

The discussion will include speakers from:

Eelco de Jong, McKinsey & Company

Eelco serves energy companies on a range of topics including downstream and customer strategy, operations and organization.  He is a core member of McKinsey’s Electric Power & Natural Gas Practice where he co-leads special initiative on disintermediation & growth.  He has led an effort to quantify the impact of disintermediation for a major US utility and has conducted dives on Energy Efficiency, Solar PV, micro-CHP, microgrids, and Electric Vehicles (including battery storage).

Prior to McKinsey, Eelco worked at Generation Investment Management, an $5B asset management company focused on integrating research on sustainability with classic value investing, where he analyzed and invested in multiple new businesses (including a VC investment in SolarCity in 2009).

Eelco has a M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, and a M.A. and B.A. from Utrecht University.

Carl Pechman, Senior Advisor for Electricity, US Department of Energy

Carl is an expert on the economics of electricity with extensive experience in state and federal regulation. During his tenure as an economist at the New York Public Service Commission, he worked on a wide variety of issues, including performance-based ratemaking, generation and transmission siting, avoided cost theory and estimation, Integrated Resource Planning, cost analysis and pricing, and creation of the New York Independent System Operator.

In 1997, Dr. Pechman founded Power Economics, Inc., a firm providing consulting and strategic advice to a broad array of clients (including major utilities, an array of customer groups from low income to industrial customers, Attorneys General, cities and national environmental groups), navigating the move to competition in the electric power industry. While at Power Economics, Dr. Pechman was involved in power market design, resource adequacy and power system design in various regions throughout the country. He acted as a special consultant to the Speaker of the California Legislature on efforts to resolve the California Energy Crisis and served as an expert witness to the California Parties on the causes and damages associated with the crisis.  Dr. Pechman led review and made public the Enron Trader tapes that demonstrated their market manipulation practices.

Dr. Pechman left Power Economics to join the Office of Energy Policy and Innovation at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, where he worked on issues related to power market design, demand response, renewable resource integration and transmission planning. He is author of numerous papers on issues related to power markets, as well as the book “Regulating Power: the Economics of Electricity in the Information Age,” which focuses on the role of models in the regulation of utilities and power markets.

Carl received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University.

Marilyn Brown, Professor, Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology

Marilyn joined Georgia Tech in 2006 after a distinguished career at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At ORNL, she held various leadership positions and led several major energy technology and policy scenario studies. Dr. Brown remains affiliated with ORNL as a Visiting Distinguished Scientist.

Marilyn’s research has included an assessment of the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, development of a national climate change technology deployment strategy, and an evaluation of the supply- and demand-side electricity resources available in the Southeast. She has authored more than 200 publications including a recently published book on Energy and American Society: Thirteen Myths.  Her research interests encompass the development and deployment of sustainable energy technologies and issues surrounding the commercialization of new technologies and the evaluation of energy programs and policies.  Marilyn serves on the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Alliance to Save Energy, the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.  In addition, she serves on the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change.

Marilyn has a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, a M.R.P. from the University of Massachusetts, and a B.A. from Rutgers University.

John Rossi, Senior Vice President, Corporate Strategy, Comverge

John is a co-founder of Comverge and he has held a variety of senior management positions within the company, including heading Engineering and Business Development. This varied background in the technology and business aspects of demand response contribute to his current role as leading Corporate Strategy. His current responsibilities including developing strategies for bringing new solutions to our residential, commercial, and industrial customers and using partnerships and innovative business models to better serve our customers.

Prior to joining Comverge, John spent 25 years at Bell Laboratories, the research and development arm of AT&T and Lucent Technologies. At Bell Labs, John held a number of engineering and management positions with a focus on signal processing, high speed communications, and utility solutions. He holds over a dozen patents on utility-related technologies.

John received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Detroit.

Santiago Grijalva, Associate Director, Strategic Energy Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology

Santiago leads research efforts on future electricity systems and smart grid that include effectively interconnecting renewable resources within the existing electric power system and to provide improved management strategies for demand response and transportation electrification.  He has pioneered work in distributed power system controls and cyber-physical energy security systems.

Most recently, Santiago served as Director for Power Systems Engineering for the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL).  His additional industry experience includes senior software architect for PowerWorld, which is a developer of innovative real-time and optimization applications used today by utilities, control centers, and universities in more than 60 countries.  Santiago also worked for the the Ecuadorian National Center for Energy Control (CENACE) as engineer and manager of the Real-Time EMS Software Department.

Santiago has a Ph.D. and M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and has published widely on the topics of power systems and smart grid.

Presentations:

Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Distributed Energy Resource Mix- Marilyn Brown

From adapting to transforming in a changing utility industry- Eelco de Jong

Prosumer-Based Decentralized Control- Santiago Grijalva

The Agile Utility: Aligning Distributed Generation with Consumer Demand- John Rossi

National Security and Energy Diversification

Lieutenant General Jeffrey W. Tally
Chief of Army Reserve and Commanding General USARC

Thursday, September 25th, 1:00 PM

Callaway Manufacturing Research Center (MaRC) auditorium
775 Ferst Drive, Atlanta 30332

The United States Army Reserve Command (USARC) consists of 205,000 authorized Soldiers and 21,000 civilians distributed among 2,000 units across the globe. The role of USARC is to provide trained, equipped, ready and accessible soldiers, leaders and units in support of a full range of military, contingency and humanitarian operations. For FY 2013, the overall budget for the Army Reserve was $8.5 billion.

Similar to the Department of the Army, the Army Reserve has been directed to comply with Congressional and Executive Orders regarding sustainability, energy metering, green house gas reductions, energy consumption and security, expanding the use of renewable energy sources with the goal of achieving “Net Zero” in water usage, waste and energy, and operational energy requirements by 2030.

Lt. Gen. Talley will discuss how diversifying the energy portfolio of the United States military influences national security policies and the R&D priorities of the Department of Defense.

In terms of background, Lt. Gen. Jeffrey Talley has more than 31 years of active and reserve military service, during which he has commanded unites at every echelon, from platoon to division-level, with duty in Korea, Kuwait, Iraq and the United States. Prior to becoming Chief of the Army Reserve in June 2012, he was President/CEO and Co-Founder and Lead Investor in Environmental Technology Solutions (ETS Partners) and an Adjunct Professor at The Johns Hopkins University.

Lt. Gen. Talley has a Ph.D. in Civil and Environment Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and an Executive M.B.A. from the University of Oxford in England.

This program is a collaboration of the Energy Club at Georgia Tech, the Georgia Tech Strategic Energy Institute, and the Georgia Tech Energy Series.

Presentations:

National Security and Energy, Challenges and Solutions- Lieutenant General Jeffrey W. Tally

The Growing Information Intensity of Energy: Industry and Technology Implications

Wednesday, April 30, 2013 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

The axiom ‘If You Can’t Measure It, You Can’t Manage It’ is destined to become increasingly relevant as organizations and individuals want to know more about the costs, attributes and effects of the energy they consume.   Numerous reference points for the intersection of energy and IT industries exist and are increasing.    Examples include:  Nest learning thermostats, ‘smart’ meters on buildings, near real-time energy monitoring, and embedded sensors and networked devices for command, control and monitoring.

Underneath these emerging applications basic questions exist about value and impact of the data and information.  Does actionable information change corporate decision-making or individual behavior?  How?  What ROI’s are achievable?

Plan to join this timely discussion on the increasingly important role of information and energy.

Peter C. Evans, Vice President, Center for Global Enterprise 

As Vice President at the Center for Global Enterprise (CGE), Peter is responsible for the Center’s research agenda, global academic partnerships and CEO Exchanges.

Previously, Peter held key strategy and market intelligence roles at General Electric. He was Director of GE Corporate’s Global Strategy and Analytics team.  He also led GE Energy’s Global Strategy and Planning team for five years, where he oversaw the Fuels, Policy, Carbon and Strategic Workforce Planning Centers of Excellence.  Prior to joining GE, he was Director, Global Oil, and Research Director of the Global Energy Forum at Cambridge Energy Research Associates (CERA).

His many articles and policy monographs include: The Age of Gas and the Power of Networks (General Electric 2013); The Industrial Internet: Pushing the Boundaries of Minds and Machines (General Electric, 2012) Japan: Bracing for an Uncertain Energy Future (Brookings Institution, 2006), Liberalizing Global Trade in Energy Services (AEI Press, 2002).

Peter holds a BA from Hampshire College and a master degree and PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sameer Vittal, Manager – Advanced Analytics, Power Generation Services, GE Power & Water

Sameer is the Engineering Manager for Advanced Analytics at the Power Generation Services division of GE Power & Water. He has been with GE since 2000 and leads a global team of data scientists responsible for developing data-analytics based technologies to monitor and optimize the performance, risk and health of gas turbine power plants. In addition to gas turbines, he has extensive experience in developing analytics solutions for renewable energy, primarily wind turbines.

Sameer has more than 17 years of experience in analytics, predictive modeling, optimization, reliability engineering, condition monitoring and risk management in the automotive and energy industries. He is a frequent speaker at industry conferences with an interest in actuarial engineering – an emerging risk management field that integrates techniques from engineering, operations research and actuarial science.

Sameer has a BE in mechanical engineering from Bangalore University as well as MS and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

John Bracey, President, Skye Energy

Skye Energy allows commercial building owners to transform scattered building data into clear efficiency projects and ongoing tracking of performance.  Leveraging a cloud based energy analysis platform, a building’s details can be analyzed by marketplace experts to find, build, and implement projects, bringing significantly lower effort and costs, better ideas, and higher volume of sales to the efficiency market.

Prior to founding Skye Energy, John spent over 10 years conducting technical energy analysis on commercial buildings, training architects and engineers on how to build better buildings.  He has spoken at numerous industry conferences on best practices.

John holds a BS in mechanical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology.

 

The Premier Sponsor for the Georgia Tech Clean Energy Series is The Tata Group.  The Tata Group is emerging as one of the world’s most trusted and respected corporate names. Combining ethical values with proven business performance and leadership, Tata has a heritage of deep social commitment that has earned the trust and respect of its stakeholders. In the United States, the Tata Group has had a presence for over 60 years. As the largest India-headquartered multinational in North America, Tata has 11 companies and more than 24,000 employees in the United States and Canada, including more than 3,800 employees in the Southeast. At Tata, innovation is a critical vector for improving quality, performance and competitiveness. The Tata Group has adopted a three-pronged strategy to encourage and enhance innovation across its companies. The three key drivers are better communication and recognition of innovative ideas and efforts; facilities and initiatives that enable learning from other companies; and support for collaborative research and partnerships with academia. For more information, please visit http://www.tata.com/ or http://northamerica.tata.com/.

Presentations:

Growing Information Intensity of Energy- Peter Evans

Information Intensity in Power Generation – Sameer Vittal

Building Energy Efficiency Platforms – John Bracey

 

Insights from the Edison Electric Institute: Disruptive Challenges: Financial Implications and Strategic Responses to a Changing Retail Electric Business

Wednesday, March 26, 2013 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

According to a number of industry analysts, the traditional utility business model of revenues based on the sale of power produced is in transition.  Technological and economic changes led by falling costs and deployment of distributed generation, e.g., photovoltaics, and increasing interest in demand side management technologies for improved efficiency are factors that could lead to changes in the electric utility industry comparable to those experienced by the telecommunications industry beginning in the late-1970s.

On March 26, plan to join an interactive discussion with the author of the insightful Edison Electric Institute report on the implications of disruptive technologies on utility business models.

Peter Kind, Executive Director, Energy Infrastructure Advocates and Senior Advisor, Macquarie Capital

Peter is the author of the Edison Electric Institute report “Disruptive Challenges: Financial Implications and Strategic Responses to a Changing Retail Electric Business.”

Peter has over 30 years of investment banking experience, with a specialization in utility and power sector corporate finance.  His banking experience includes capital market advisory services and merger and acquisition and corporate finance advice.  Peter’s work includes all sectors of regulated utility and non-regulated power businesses.  He has been actively involved in outreach to regulators and policymakers, including work as an expert witness in regulatory proceedings.

Peter’s experience include the Bank of America, where he lead the Power and Utilities Corporate and Investment Banking effort, and Citigroup and Kidder Peabody, where he co-directed the Power and Utilities teams in each of those firms.

Peter holds a MBA in Finance from New York University and a BBA in Accounting from Iona College.  He practiced as a CPA until 1981.  From 2008 to 2011, Peter was Co-Chairman of Edison Electric Institute’s Wall Street Advisory Group.

John Higley, Managing Partner, Energy and Environment Enterprises, former Managing Partner and Global Energy & Utilities Partner, Deloitte Consulting

Energy and Environmental Enterprises provides advisory services to corporations and utilities for energy supply management, renewable resource evaluation and integration, and resource optimization.

Prior to his current firm, John was the Managing Partner for Deloitte’s Global Energy and Utilities Practice, which engaged in strategic analysis, mergers and acquisitions and systems integration and deployment.  Before joining Deloitte, John was Senior Vice President of Energy Management Associates (EMA), an EDS Company.  John’s experience at EMA included utility rate analysis and integrated resource planning.  EMA developed and supported PROMOD, a production costing system used by over 80 percent of the utility generating capacity in the US.

John is a graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology with a BS in Industrial Engineering.

The Premier Sponsor for the Georgia Tech Clean Energy Series is The Tata Group.  The Tata Group is emerging as one of the world’s most trusted and respected corporate names. Combining ethical values with proven business performance and leadership, Tata has a heritage of deep social commitment that has earned the trust and respect of its stakeholders. In the United States, the Tata Group has had a presence for over 60 years. As the largest India-headquartered multinational in North America, Tata has 11 companies and more than 24,000 employees in the United States and Canada, including more than 3,800 employees in the Southeast. At Tata, innovation is a critical vector for improving quality, performance and competitiveness. The Tata Group has adopted a three-pronged strategy to encourage and enhance innovation across its companies. The three key drivers are better communication and recognition of innovative ideas and efforts; facilities and initiatives that enable learning from other companies; and support for collaborative research and partnerships with academia. For more information, please visithttp://www.tata.com/ or http://northamerica.tata.com/.

Participants can attend for free in person at the Centergy Building on Georgia Tech’s campus or via Webinar.

Presentations:

Disruptive Challenges Facing Electric Utilities – Peter Kind;

Advancing Electric Vehicle and Plug-in Hybrid Rollout

Wednesday, Feb 26, 2014 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Metropolitan Atlanta is one of nation’s largest markets for plug-in electric vehicles. As of mid-2013, 52% of American plug-in electric car registrations were concentrated in five metropolitan areas: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, New York and Atlanta. While over 72,028 all-electric (EV) cars (43.0% of the EV/PHEV market) have been delivered to retail customers between December 2010 and December 2013, more than 95,589 plug-in hybrids (PHEV) have been sold (57.0% of the EV/PHEV market) during the same time period. (Electric Drive Transportation Association.)

What are the key drivers affecting EV and PHEV deployment? Incentives? Infrastructure? Technology? Do EVs and PHEVs fill distinctive segments in this competitive marketplace? What is motivating the consumer to purchase either of these vehicles?

Mark your calendar for the Wednesday, February 26th program. Plan to join a discussion that will be both visionary and pragmatic.

Andrew Lennon, eMobility After Sales Program Manager, Porsche Cars North America (PCNA)

Andrew leads and manages all aspects of the PHEV program as it relates to vehicle and electrical vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) service and support activities for dealers and customers. Andrew and his team are the main dealer contact point within PCNA AfterSales for all issues related to plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Before joining Porsche’s PHEV program, Andrew has held various positions within PCNA that include regulatory affairs and technical support as relates to the Porsche product line.

Jules Toraya, Zero Waste Manager, City of Atlanta

Currently, Jules focuses on reducing the environmental impact of waste in downtown Atlanta’s convention district and related operations. Previously he served as a Project Manager for the Center for Transportation (CTE) and the Environment, Clean Cities Atlanta and the City of Atlanta leading the development of the City of Atlanta’s plug-in electric vehicle readiness strategy, and has developed a plug-in electric vehicle readiness workbook for municipalities throughout the Atlanta metropolitan region to implement. His efforts resulted in CTE securing $545,000 from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Development Program. He coordinates a local public-private partnership Plug-in Georgia for plug-in electric vehicle outreach and advocacy. Jule’s next project is to repurpose veterans to gain employment developing sustainable transportation systems in conjunction with the renewable energy market VFAI (Veterans Fuel American Innovation).

Greg Crittenden, Founder and CEO, Metro Plug-In

After a 30 year career as a commercial and military pilot, Greg started Metro Plug-In in early 2010 with the idea of contributing, in a small way, to the energy security and independence of the US.

Since that time, Metro Plug-In has grown to become a nationally recognized leader in EV charging station sales and installation expertise. The company has customers throughout the US, including Hawaii, and the Caribbean. In addition, Metro Plug-In is an EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment) Industry Specialist as approved and designated by the Eaton Corporation.

The Premier Sponsor for the Georgia Tech Clean Energy Series is The Tata Group. The Tata Group is emerging as one of the world’s most trusted and respected corporate names. Combining ethical values with proven business performance and leadership, Tata has a heritage of deep social commitment that has earned the trust and respect of its stakeholders. In the United States, the Tata Group has had a presence for over 60 years. As the largest India-headquartered multinational in North America, Tata has 11 companies and more than 24,000 employees in the United States and Canada, including more than 3,800 employees in the Southeast. At Tata, innovation is a critical vector for improving quality, performance and competitiveness. The Tata Group has adopted a three-pronged strategy to encourage and enhance innovation across its companies. The three key drivers are better communication and recognition of innovative ideas and efforts; facilities and initiatives that enable learning from other companies; and support for collaborative research and partnerships with academia. For more information, please visit http://www.tata.com/ or http://northamerica.tata.com/.

Participants can attend for free in person at the Centergy Building on Georgia Tech’s campus or via Webinar.

 

Presentations:

Porsche Advancing Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Rollout – Andrew Lennon

Advancing Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Rollout – Jules Toraya

Advancing Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Rollout – Greg Crittenden

Insights from Edison Electric Institute: “Disruptive Challenges: Financial Implications and Strategic Responses to a Changing Retail Electric Business.”

Due to flight cancellations and inclement weather, the January GT Clean Energy Series program on “Disruptive Challenges: Financial Implications and Strategic Responses to a Changing Retail Electric Business” has been rescheduled to Wednesday, March 26, 2014.

Wednesday, Jan 29th 2014 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

According to a number of industry analysts, the traditional utility business model of revenues based on the sale of power produced is in transition.  Technological and economic changes led by falling costs and deployment of distributed generation, e.g., photovoltaics, and increasing interest in demand side management technologies for improved efficiency are factors that could lead to changes in the electric utility industry comparable to those experienced by the telecommunications industry beginning in the late-1970s.

On January 29, plan to join an interactive discussion with the author of the insightful Edison Electric Institute report and a technology analyst with the Electric Power Research Institute on the implications of disruptive technologies on utility business models.

Peter Kind, Executive Director, Energy Infrastructure Advocates and Senior Advisor, Macquarie Capital

Peter is the author of the Edison Electric Institute report “Disruptive Challenges: Financial Implications and Strategic Responses to a Changing Retail Electric Business.”

Peter has over 30 years of investment banking experience, with a specialization in utility and power sector corporate finance.  His banking experience includes capital market advisory services and merger and acquisition and corporate finance advice.  Peter’s work includes all sectors of regulated utility and non-regulated power businesses.  He has been actively involved in outreach to regulators and policymakers, including work as an expert witness in regulatory proceedings.

Peter’s experience include the Bank of America, where he lead the Power and Utilities Corporate and Investment Banking effort, and Citigroup and Kidder Peabody, where he co-directed the Power and Utilities teams in each of those firms.

Peter holds a MBA in Finance from New York University and a BBA in Accounting from Iona College.  He practiced as a CPA until 1981.  From 2008 to 2011, Peter was Co-Chairman of Edison Electric Institute’s Wall Street Advisory Group.

Ronald Schoff, Program Manager, Technology Innovation, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

EPRI is a utility-wide, nonprofit collaborative R&D program that manages collaborative research on behalf of the electric utility industry, the industry’s customers and society at large.

EPRI’s Technology Innovation (TI) program is focused on research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) to maintain a full pipeline of promising ideas and potential breakthroughs for enabling long-term operations of existing infrastructure, achieving near-zero emissions at fossil plants, expanding renewable energy deployment, increasing efficiency, advancing the smart grid, and promoting water resource sustainability. TI addresses these strategic industry issues across a 5- to 20-year horizon. The crosscutting RD&D portfolio scouts, influences, and builds on early-stage work throughout the worldwide science and technology communities to capture innovations for application-oriented development and demonstration.

In a previous role as Senior Project Manager, Ron’s responsibilities include managing and conducting evaluations of advanced power generation technologies, including Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) with carbon capture and storage (CCS), ultrasupercritical pulverized coal (USCPC), natural gas-fired combined cycles (NGCC), and power cycles incorporating carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS).

Ron has a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and a MS in Chemical Engineering from Villanova University.  He is a senior member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

John Higley, Managing Partner, Energy and Environment Enterprises, former Managing Partner and Global Energy & Utilities Partner, Deloitte Consulting

Energy and Environmental Enterprises provides advisory services to corporations and utilities for energy supply management, renewable resource evaluation and integration, and resource optimization.

Prior to his current firm, John was the Managing Partner for Deloitte’s Global Energy and Utilities Practice, which engaged in strategic analysis, mergers and acquisitions and systems integration and deployment.  Before joining Deloitte, John was Senior Vice President of Energy Management Associates (EMA), an EDS Company.  John’s experience at EMA included utility rate analysis and integrated resource planning.  EMA developed and supported PROMOD, a production costing system used by over 80 percent of the utility generating capacity in the US.

John is a graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology with a BS in Industrial Engineering.

Alternative Power: Benefits of Combined Heat & Power, and Landfill Gas

Wednesday, Dec 4, 2013 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Combined heat and power (CHP) technology can provide critical facilities (e.g. hospitals, wastewater treatment), businesses, institutions, and communities with more resilient and reliable heat and power, while at the same time reducing energy costs and harmful emissions.  Complimenting CHP technology is methane gas from landfills, which is often overlooked as a viable, cost-effective input for generating power via CHP.  (Landfills are the third largest source of anthropogenic methane gas produced in the United States.)

On December 4, plan to join an insightful and practical discussion on the regional viability of CHP and landfill gas in terms of technology viability, economics and uses.

Marilyn Brown, Professor, Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology

Marilyn joined Georgia Tech in 2006 after a distinguished career at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At ORNL, she held various leadership positions and led several major energy technology and policy scenario studies. Dr. Brown remains affiliated with ORNL as a Visiting Distinguished Scientist.

Marilyn’s research has included an assessment of the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, development of a national climate change technology deployment strategy, and an evaluation of the supply- and demand-side electricity resources available in the Southeast. She has authored more than 200 publications including a recently published book on Energy and American Society: Thirteen Myths.  Her research interests encompass the development and deployment of sustainable energy technologies and issues surrounding the commercialization of new technologies and the evaluation of energy programs and policies.  Marilyn serves on the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Alliance to Save Energy, the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.  In addition, she serves on the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change.

Marilyn has a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University, a M.R.P. from the University of Massachusetts, and a B.A. from Rutgers University.

Richard Crowther, PE, Manager, Sustainability, Coca-Cola Refreshments

Richard manages Sustainability related activities for Coca-Cola Refreshments across North America and has responsibility for improving the energy efficiency, water efficiency, in-plant recycling rates and net carbon impact of production and warehouse facilities as well as the transportation fleet and vending/cooler equipment.  He has nearly two decades of diverse experience in the energy efficiency / sustainability field and is familiar with all aspects of the industry from supply planning and demand reduction to carbon accounting and clean-tech project developed such as use of bio-fuels, cogeneration, solar power and fuel cells.

His corporate experience includes The Coca-Cola Company, York International, The Southern Company, and Atlanta Gas Light Company.  Richard is a Certified Professional Engineer, a Certified Energy Manager, and Certified Cogeneration Professional.

Richard has a M.B.A. from Georgia State University and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Auburn University.

Isaac Panzarella, PE, Director, U.S. DOE Southeast CHP Technical Assistance Partnership

North Carolina State University

Isaac is the Clean Power & Efficiency project coordinator at the N.C. Solar Center, and provides technical and feasibility assessment services for combined heat and power systems, waste heat recovery and industrial energy efficiency improvements. His mission is to help people to realize that the future is here today when it comes to clean energy and energy efficiency.

Isaac has worked to promote sustainable building systems and energy conservation as a partner with two consulting engineering firms. He has worked on many project commissions in the State of North Carolina, including the North Carolina Botanical Garden Visitor Center, dedicated by Governor Beverly Perdue in the fall of 2009 as the first State owned building with a LEED Platinum rating target. His sustainable building systems design experience includes solar thermal and photovoltaic energy systems, central cooling and heating plants, geothermal heat pump systems, energy recovery and energy management systems.

Isaac has a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from N.C. State University.

Richard Sedano, Director, Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP)

Rich advises state commissions and other decision-makers about cost-effective investments in energy efficiency, distributed generation and renewable energy.  Rich served as commissioner of the Vermont Department of Public Service (VDPS) for nine years before joining RAP in 2001. Prior to serving as commissioner, he held various engineering staff positions at VDPS, which represents utility consumers in all regulatory matters and is the state’s energy office and consumer advocate. He also worked as an engineer in power generation for Philadelphia Electric Company.

In November 2009, Rich was awarded the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners’ Mary Kilmarx Award. He served as chair of NASEO from 1998-2000. He is currently a member of the board of directors of Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships.

Rich received a M.S. in engineering management from Drexel University and a B.S. in engineering from Brown University.

 

Presentations:

Industrial Combined Heat and Power: Why is it Stalled in the U.S.? – Marilyn Brown

Coca-Cola’s Atlanta Landfill Gas Cogeneration Project – Richard Crowther

Combined Heat and Power Increasing Awareness and Action- Isaac Panzarella

CHP Power Sector Policy: How government action enables CHP – Richard Sedano

Distributed Generation and Rooftop PV: Viable for the South?

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Distributed generation (DG) refers to power generation at the point of consumption. Generating power on-site, rather than centrally, eliminates the cost, complexity, interdependencies, and inefficiencies associated with transmission and distribution. Like distributed computing (i.e. the PC) and distributed telephony (i.e. the mobile phone), distributed generation shifts control to the consumer.

Historically, distributed generation meant combustion generators (e.g. diesel gensets). They were affordable, usually reliable, but not very clean.  Recently, solar has become a popular distributed generation option. Although the output is clean it is also intermittent, making it a challenging strategy for businesses that need power around the clock, including when the sun is not shining.

On October 30, plan to participate in discussion with a knowledgeable and experienced panel about the pros and cons of distributed generation and rooftop PV.

Farah Mandich, McKinsey & Co.

Farah Mandich is a Senior Research Analyst in McKinsey’s Americas Electric Power & Natural Gas Practice. She joined McKinsey in 2008 and has been building a specialty in renewable power, particularly solar, throughout her 5-year career with the Firm. Farah participates in studies across a variety of industries; recent client service includes assessing a utility’s potential to lose demand due to rooftop solar, and helping a state government determine opportunity for microgrids. Prior to joining McKinsey, Farah attended Texas Christian University, where she completed an internship in the White House National Economic Council, and earned a B.S. in Economics.

Deidra Cunningham, IKEA Atlanta

Deidra Cunningham is Marketing and Public Relations Manager for IKEA Atlanta.  She has been involved in a number of facets of IKEA’s business, which range from consumer products to commercial products and sales.  Since 2010 Deidra has been the face of IKEA in sharing the great strides the company takes locally to reduce its carbon footprint.  Prior to IKEA, Deidra’s experience includes roles at Kimball Office and the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.  She is an active volunteer and is involved with numerous organizations that include the Green Business Conference & Expo, the Metro Atlanta Chamber and Atlanta Women in Business.

Deidra has a B.A. from Duke University in Political Science, African American Studies and Education.

Steve Furtado, Turner Enterprises, Inc.

Steve Furtado is property and facilities manager for Turner Enterprises, Inc.  In this capacity, he oversees The Turner Building operations, special projects and new initiatives. He also manages renewable energy upgrades, where he oversaw the construction of the Luckie Street Property 200kw parking lot solar installation, which was completed in two phases over a two-year period. In addition, he served on the project management team for the construction of the Costilla Lodge solar project located on the company’s Vermejo Park Ranch in New Mexico.  A member of the Turner Enterprises Green Team, Steve’s tireless efforts positioned the Turner Building as a top contender in The Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge.

Turner Enterprises, Inc. (TEI), a private company, manages the business interests, land holdings and investments of Ted Turner, including the oversight of two million acres in 12 states and in Argentina, and more than 55,000 bison. TEI also works closely with Turner’s philanthropic and charitable interests, including the founding and ongoing operations of the United Nations Foundation, Nuclear Threat Initiative, Turner Foundation, Captain Planet Foundation, and the Turner Endangered Species Fund. Turner Enterprises is headquartered in the Turner Building in Atlanta, Georgia, also home to the Ted’s Montana Grill restaurant chain and Turner Renewable Energy.

The Premier Sponsor for the Georgia Tech Clean Energy Series is The Tata Group.  The Tata Group is emerging as one of the world’s most trusted and respected corporate names. Combining ethical values with proven business performance and leadership, Tata has a heritage of deep social commitment that has earned the trust and respect of its stakeholders. In the United States, the Tata Group has had a presence for over 60 years. As the largest India-headquartered multinational in North America, Tata has 11 companies and more than 24,000 employees in the United States and Canada, including more than 3,800 employees in the Southeast. At Tata, innovation is a critical vector for improving quality, performance and competitiveness. The Tata Group has adopted a three-pronged strategy to encourage and enhance innovation across its companies. The three key drivers are better communication and recognition of innovative ideas and efforts; facilities and initiatives that enable learning from other companies; and support for collaborative research and partnerships with academia. For more information, please visit http://www.tata.com/ or http://northamerica.tata.com/.

 

Presentations:

Rooftop PV and the state of Southeast markets – Farah Mandich

Renewable Energy @ IKEA: An Approach to On-Site Generation- Deirdra Cunningham

PV at Turner Enterprises – Steve Furtado

Find Us

The regular venue for the Series is the Hodges Room in Tech Square:

Centergy One
75 5th Street, NW; Hodges Room
Atlanta, GA 30308
404-894-2376